Category Archives: French Guiana Overlanding Blog

We made a teeny bit of insignificant history crossing the Oiapoque River. The bridge had just opened a couple of weeks before we arrived and guess what…? We were the first Brits ever to cross from Brazil to French Guiana by road!  Travelling across French Guiana during a period of labour strikes and road blockades can really slow the progress of an overland trip. But the nature and wildlife, the interest of Isles du Salut (Papillon Island) and the spectacle of an Ariane 5 rocket launch from the Kourou space centre made it all very worthwhile. At least with the slow pace, we had plenty of time to do the French Guiana overlanding blog…

Monster Turtles and Rockets

There are turtles and there are giant leather-back turtles. And then there are space rockets. An odd combination, but in French Guiana we’re lucky enough see both in the same week. The end of our last blog featured a cliff-hanger, waiting to see whether our application for tickets to the next Ariane 5 rocket launch will be successful. Well… we got them! And whilst we contain our excitement before the big launch day, we head off to see the giant leather-back turtles on the beaches of the far north corner.

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Protests and Papillon

Damn tedious all this protesting and road-blockade malarkey, but hey… ‘C’est la vie’, as they say here in French Guiana. In our last blog we arrived in a charming but blockade-ridden, far-flung part of the EU. Now, after a month of disruption, the protesters toddle home and things gradually get back to normal. For us this means freedom to move around the country, the re-start of the Space Race (officially exciting!) and some first-hand proof of Hollywood’s tish, tosh and piffle!

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French Guiana… bonjour!

Just over the bridge from Brazil and… politics! Overlanders are always best advised to avoid national politics as they travel, but sometimes things just jump in your face. French Guiana is an overseas department of mainland France. It’s officially part of the EU, it has the Euro currency and, we find out to our cost, the people have the same French propensity for road blockades and labour strikes when they feel hard done-by! Continue reading